Stuart Lovatt

Forum Replies Created

  • in reply to: What do you think of Romag solar panels? #13610

    Stuart Lovatt
    Keymaster

    Although we don’t comment on individual manufacturers or brands, there are (like any other industry) varying degree’s of quality.

    In regard to performance, panels do vary depending on whether they are Mono-crystalline or Poly-crystalline.

    Even these systems vary with a difference of 180-240 watts per panel. This kind of difference will make a big difference to your overall ‘return on investment’ over the long lifespan of the feed-in tariff scheme.

    As such, we would always recommend that you get three quotes because the brand may be good, but the non-affiliated installers may be expensive, or vice versa.

    You may find this article helpful: https://www.powermyhome.uk/pv-solar-panels/return-investment-linked-price-pay-solar-panels


    Stuart Lovatt
    Keymaster

    Both Solaredge and Enphase have problems with Sunpower and BenQ panels voltage.

    If space is a premium has the installer tried Pansonic Hybrids. I think they are compatible and are continually fighting with Sunpower over which is the best panel.

    If space is not an issue, then for my money the ROI with a good quality REC, Hyundai or LG panel is better.

    Hope this helps.

    in reply to: Quotes for a solar panel installation #13286

    Stuart Lovatt
    Keymaster

    Seems a couple of grand too expensive. For a comparative quote, you can contact our network of MCS installers at:

    https://www.powermyhome.uk/quotes/

    The calculations seem correct and the panels, once you have sourced from a reasonably priced installer and fitted them, will work very well for you. Yes, even in Blighty.

    in reply to: What does a ‘tier one’ solar panel mean? #13073

    Stuart Lovatt
    Keymaster

    A Tier 1 Panel means it is a Grade A solar cell and will have its performance claims backed-up by a 3rd party

    If it’s a Tier1 panel look at the data sheet and if it is backed by a 3rd party. i.e. Chubb or Zurich on its performance, then it is a genuine tier one panel.

    in reply to: Will my electricity meter go backward? #13026

    Stuart Lovatt
    Keymaster

    Hi

    This is something that used to happen to older photovoltaic installations.

    What used to happen with the old magnetic meters is when there is a flow of electrons out of the house, it moved the magnetic dial in the opposite direction reducing the KWH reading.

    Today, all domestic installations have an export meter installed alongside. There is now a legal requirement on all feed-in tariff applications for the recipient to inform the Energy Company if they notice the meter turning backwards.

    Hope this helps.

    in reply to: What's the problem with free solar panels? #12987

    Stuart Lovatt
    Keymaster

    I have always recommended purchasing your own system for this very reason.

    In the rush to take advantage of the then feed-in tariff scheme, some solar companies decided to offer solar panels to homeowners. I suppose in the gold rush of that time, nobody asked the mortgage lenders what they thought of the idea of third parties attaching technology to property.

    Those who took advantage of ‘free solar panel’ offers are now beginning to realise the implications of their decision to install free panels.

    The principle was sound, but only if you know 100% that you won’t need to sell your home before the duration of your contract.

    I only hope this doesn’t drag the solar industry through the mud when or if legal issues arise as more and more people find themselves prevented from selling their homes.

    If you do find yourself in this type of situation, then the only option is to buy out your contract to gain full ownership of the system yourself.

    Learn more about free solar panels here >>

    in reply to: Varying PV module outputs #12975

    Stuart Lovatt
    Keymaster

    Hi Les

    Varying panels are possible but not recommended. Depending on the size of system, panels can receive varying amounts of sunlight hitting the array, so varying amounts of output from each panel will not upset your system.

    That said, the specification or full ‘peak out’ put of such a system will never be fully reached, so you could be short changing yourself by accepting such a system, not only output wise but financially too.

    Best practice determines all panels be the same wattage and specified to a maximum peak out. Anything less than that is short change.

    in reply to: Does long term life mean long term servicing #12940

    Stuart Lovatt
    Keymaster

    Hi

    Nine times out of ten if a pv solar system fails it will fail very early after the installation and is the faulty of the inverter.

    The solar industry has grown very quickly over the last couple of years and yes there are many new companies. As a result, government regulations have addressed of the most technical issues through rigorous standards.

    My best advice is get three quotes, make sure the companies are REAL assured and MCS accredited. Check any facts given and were possible use a company that has a few years experience under its belt.


    Stuart Lovatt
    Keymaster

    Unfortunately you have been misinformed.

    The feed-in tariff is fixed to an installations location, i.e. the property or business which accommodated the installed solar panels.

    If you are moving house, then the ownership of the panels must be transferred to the new owners of your house. This should not be a major issue in most cases as the solar panels will help sell your home quicker and for more than a property without.

    Hope this helps.

    in reply to: Cable from inverter to main board #12919

    Stuart Lovatt
    Keymaster

    Absolutely not. The PV circuit has to be on its own radial circuit with its own 16amp MCB or RCD. Wiring it into the house socket circuit is an absolute non starter.

    Send me more details


    Stuart Lovatt
    Keymaster

    I would suggest teaming up with an electrician to do the main wiring inside the property. It is law that you need a ‘Part P’ qualification to complete the internal parts of the installation, but you can certainly do the external roofing aspect of the install yourself.

    Another issue to take into consideration is the feed-in tariff incentive which is currently available. This will need to be signed off by a fully accredited MCS approved installer.

    I hope this helps with your enquiry.

    in reply to: I love my solar panels but… #12877

    Stuart Lovatt
    Keymaster

    Hi

    Not sure I understand, but you have a generation tariff which you will be paid for surplus energy you don’t use. Many people put them on second homes because they get paid for the unused energy exported out while the house is not in use, the same is true with your home. You don’t have to use the energy to benefit from the energy they generate as you can import/export as opposed to just importing as per standard homes. The amount you get paid for exporting is dependent on the tariff rate you signed up too.

    Another option is to heat your hot water with your PV for free using this system:

    Hope this helps.